LEGO book review: Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls

Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls has been sitting on my shelf for a while, (terrible, I know.) In my defense I had a book to finish, short stories to hand in and a workshop to plan. But once I had finished relaunching my website, it was the first book I reached for. To sum up my thoughts – it’s just magical.

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Book review: Collective Amnesia by Koleka Putuma

My shelf of South African poetry can hardly be called a collection. Strange Fruit by Helen Moffett, Please, Take Photographs by Sindiwe Magona, Ingrid Jonker’s Black Butterflies translated by Andre Brink, The Tempest Prognosticator by Isobel Dixon, Doo-Wop Girls of the Universe by Finuala Dowing, Matric Rage by Genna Gardini. I’m ashamed that I don’t own more. Continue reading “Book review: Collective Amnesia by Koleka Putuma”

LEGO book review: The Djinn Falls in Love and Other Stories

Edited by Jared Shurin and Mahvesh Murad, this gorgeous anthology features a diverse array of authors, including Nnedi Okorafor, Neil Gaiman, EJ Swift and James Smythe.

The collection comprises dreamy tales with a palpable middle-eastern flavour, reminiscent of One Thousand and One Nights. Many of the stories are set in the middle east. What holds them together is that they all feature the legendary djinn, a creature from Arabian mythology – commonly known as the genie from Aladdin’s lamp.

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Book review: The Fifth Mrs Brink

The Fifth Mrs Brink is the memoir of writer and academic Karina Szczurek, the fifth wife of author Andre P Brink.

The book describes their romance and happy marriage, but it also offers a portrait of the woman behind the title. Karina writes that to know her, you must visit the places close to her heart, and in this book she shares some of the moments that have defined her.
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LEGO book review: The Fault in our Stars

From  the archive: 5 June 2014

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I read The Fault in Our Stars over Christmas (it was a gift to myself). In fact, I very rudely sat outside in the sun, while my partner and his family were inside in the middle of Christmas lunch celebrations. I couldn’t put the book down, not even on Christmas Day.

(See this picture? That’s me stretched out between two camping chairs while trifle is being served inside.)

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LEGO book review: The Roanoke Girls

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I know a few people who make a habit of not reading Next Big Thing books because ultimately, the end result never quite lives up to the hype. (I haven’t read The Girl on the Train and the movie’s already gone to DVD).

But sometimes it does.

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LEGO book review: Closed Casket

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I’m not quite sure why I love Agatha Christie mysteries so much. Nostalgia. The challenge of trying to figure out who did it. I read them again and again, especially around this time of year. And each re-read is as satisfying as the first time round.

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When a book is so much more than a book

To call myself a Harry Potter fan would be an understatement.

One of my best friends gave me a homemade Harry Potter Monopoly set for my birthday this year. She has a twin set herself, with different properties and Chance questions. The reason we’re friends in the first place is because of our mutual love of the boy wizard. (We’re the type of fans that immediately pick up the mistakes in the Harry Potter Trivial Pursuit game.)
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LEGO book review: The Girls

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Everybody wants to belong.

After her best friend ditches her, fourteen-year old Evie has to spend her summer wandering around the town alone. That’s when she notices the girls. They’re raggedy around the edges, with long hair blowing freely in the breeze. They’re misfits, who shoplift and break into people’s homes and even scrounge for food in dumpsters. But there’s something magical about them. They live without rules in a big old house near a creek and have wild parties at night around bonfires and burning cars. Their leader, a charismatic musician named Russell, teaches them about free love and togetherness.
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Book review: The Monogram Murders

I was extremely skeptical when Harper Collins announced they were publishing a new Poirot novel, but since it was officially “the new Agatha Christie” I had to read it.

I used to read a lot of Christie’s novels as a kid. Mostly because my mother collected them, so there were always loads of the dog-eared paperbacks and old hardcovers in the house.
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